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April 30, 2013
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Not much to say about it yet, but it's certainly interesting: phys.org/news/2013-04-scientis…

They're looking for melanosomes, so despite the article's speculation the scientists most probably aren't going to find any green. We still have quite a wide color palette to place bets on, though. And it's only a skin sample too, so unfortunately we won't know the animal's entire color scheme. But whatever their findings are, it'll give paleoartists a new starting point. If it's reddish, from now on we'll all make sure to include some red on our reconstructions of this particular species (which isn't identified in the article, though I'm assuming it's Edmontosaurus).

-Rick Charles
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:icondinobirdman:
DinoBirdMan Featured By Owner May 1, 2013  Student Artist
True green hadrosaur like Edmontosaurus? I hope it's gonna be.
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:icondeinonychusempire:
DeinonychusEmpire Featured By Owner May 1, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Not only is green an extremely unlikely color to find in melanosome-based pigmentation, but I'm personally not fond of green dinosaurs anyway, so I won't mind at all if the findings reveal something other than green. =P
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:icondinobirdman:
DinoBirdMan Featured By Owner May 1, 2013  Student Artist
Okay.^^;
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:iconorionide5:
Orionide5 Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2013
The thing is, though, birds have their skin colored by not just melanin but carotenoids, which give a bright red, orange, pink or yellow color and don't fossilize. A bird with carotenoids but no melanin: [link] A bird with melanin but no carotenoids: [link]
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:icondeinonychusempire:
DeinonychusEmpire Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
What are you inferring?
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:iconorionide5:
Orionide5 Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2013
Basically that whatever melanosomes (grays, browns, dull red, orange and black) they find, it may also have had bright red, yellow, orange that would remain open to speculation.
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:icondeinonychusempire:
DeinonychusEmpire Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
Ah. That must be applicable to the known coloration of certain feathered dinosaurs as well, then.
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:iconorionide5:
Orionide5 Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2013
Actually, only Neoaves can have carotenoids in their feathers, but I think there are some other pigments that don't fossilize maybe.
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:iconbeastisign:
beastisign Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2013  Student Digital Artist
That's amazing!! I'm guessing it'll be a sort of a reddish-brown.
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:iconthemorlock:
TheMorlock Featured By Owner Apr 30, 2013  Student General Artist
Awesome!!!
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