Shop Mobile More Submit  Join Login
Carcharodontosaurus saharicus by DeinonychusEmpire Carcharodontosaurus saharicus by DeinonychusEmpire
Carcharodontosaurus saharicus (Saharan shark-toothed lizard) was a species of large theropod dinosaur, and the type species of genus Carcharodontosaurus. It was initially discovered by Charles Deperet and J. Savornin in Algeria, Africa in 1927 and classified as Megalosaurus saharicus before being reclassified under it's currently recognized name in 1931 by Ernst Stromer von Reichenbach.
Estimates size Carcharodontosaurus at around forty feet long, give or take. It was a little bigger than Tyrannosaurus rex, though certainly not as robust. Though it is one of the largest known theropods in the fossil record, it was contemporaneous with the single largest known theropod Spinosaurus aegyptiacus. Because Carcharodontosaurus and Spinosaurus occupied vastly different ecological niches, they may have likely been able to avoid each other and therefore occupy the same environment as is suggested by the fossil record. Typically two large carnivores can't co-exist with each other because of ecological conflict, which would not have been the case for Carcharodontosaurus and Spinosaurus.

Images acquired via Google images were referenced for this illustration. No copyright infringement intended.
Add a Comment:
 
:iconsameerprehistorica:
SameerPrehistorica Featured By Owner Sep 2, 2012  Hobbyist
very nice...The one thing i don't get is why they named it as shark-toothed lizard.I mean, its teeth is not like shark's teeth in anyway.It is similar as Giganotosaurus teeth.
Reply
:iconmegabass22:
megabass22 Featured By Owner Aug 14, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
But you do realise how dumb Giganotosaurusdontosaurus sounds right? 
The teeth look similar because of the fact that they are closely related, but naming it as Giganotosaurusdontosaurus (Giganotosaurus - toothed lizard) or Paragiganotosaurus (Similar to Giganotosaurus), would have made little sense, since Carcharodontosaurus was discovered 70 years before Giganotosaurus.

Carcharodontosaurus tooth: www.fossilsplus.com/store/prod…
Shark tooth: upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia…

They do in fact look kinda similar, and they are both very thin and blade like with serrations, i guess it was the first thing that came into the mind of the people that described it.
Then there´s the fact that no one can do anything about it now, it´s been described already.
Reply
:iconestevam-bernardis:
Estevam-Bernardis Featured By Owner Feb 19, 2012  Student
AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Reply
:iconzombiesaurian:
ZombieSaurian Featured By Owner Jun 21, 2011  Student Digital Artist
Probably one of the most badass colors I've seen on this guy! Great job! Also I never told you, but you have gotten me to follow your speulative drawings when I draw.
Reply
:icondeinonychusempire:
DeinonychusEmpire Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2011  Hobbyist General Artist
Thinking speculatively is definitely the best route to travel when illustrating paleoart! It gives the animal a more realistic touch, in my opinion. We don't know exactly what dinosaurs looked like in life, but taking guesses at it is better than resorting to adding muscle and skin over the skeleton and calling it a "reconstruction".
Reply
:iconzombiesaurian:
ZombieSaurian Featured By Owner Jun 24, 2011  Student Digital Artist
Oh definately! It's one ting to restore skin, but it is another thing when speculating on what it had on say, a sexual display organ.
Reply
Add a Comment:
 
×




Details

Submitted on
June 19, 2011
Image Size
1.2 MB
Resolution
2990×1202
Link
Thumb
Embed

Stats

Views
2,664 (3 today)
Favourites
36 (who?)
Comments
6
Downloads
208
×