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About Varied / Hobbyist Member Rick Charles20/Male/United States Group :iconjplegacy: JPLegacy
 
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Rick Charles
Artist | Hobbyist | Varied
United States
Current Residence: Munising, Michigan, United States, North America, Earth, Solar System, Milky Way, Virgo
deviantWEAR sizing preference: adult medium
Favourite genre of music: modern classic, techno, dubstep
Operating System: Windows 7 Ultimate
MP3 player of choice: Sony Walkman
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The full title would have been, "The New Jurassic World Trailer and Why the Critics Need to Shut Up," but I didn't have room for that. As of writing this, the first teaser trailer for Jurassic World has yet to release (we've still got a few more days to wait), but a teaser of the teaser (don't ask) did release today, which you can view here if you haven't seen it yet. This "teaserception trailer" is literally only a mere twenty seconds long, but it has already sparked a wildfire of critics shredding it and by extension Jurassic World apart. The two main criticisms I've heard so far are that the dinosaurs are inaccurate and the CGI is bad.

Where should I start?

"The dinosaurs are inaccurate." The majority, if not all, of the more anal paleontology enthusiasts on the Internet were already pretty upset with Jurassic World after director Colin Trevorrow Tweeted "No feathers. #JP4" back in March 2013, which set the stage for Jurassic World deliberately taking a different direction than depicting its dinosaurs "accurately" in accordance with paleontology's current understanding of dinosaurs. The new teaserception trailer has only reaffirmed that, showcasing clearly featherless ornithomimosaurs. I can only shake my head in disbelief at this criticism. THIS IS JURASSIC PARK. THE "DINOSAURS" ARE GENETICALLY ENGINEERED THEME PARK MONSTERS. Jurassic Park III (as much as most fans dislike it) established that. Hell, even the ORIGINAL Michael Crichton novel established that. It's been a while since I've read the novel, and I've only read it once, but I do remember something about the InGen geneticists having tailored their dinosaurs' genetics to look more like the culturally recognizable idea of dinosaurs of the time (1980s-90s), as opposed to recreating them as faithfully as possible to their prehistoric counterparts. The "dinosaurs" of Jurassic Park and now Jurassic World are man-made monsters catering to a scientifically ill-informed audience. It is what the park guests want to see, so it is what the park is offering them. It's business. InGen and whatever the new organization is are essentially service-providing businesses, like any theme park or zoo is. I want a movie with paleontologically accurate dinosaurs in it as much as the next paleontology enthusiast, but I'm not going to hold a movie accountable for accuracy that wasn't supposed to be accurate in the first place. Jurassic Park is a cautionary tale about the foolishness of tampering with nature, it is not about pioneering the cultural view of dinosaurs. The latter is what the first Jurassic Park film dared to accomplish in the early 1990s, but the field of paleontology has advanced far beyond that, and Jurassic World is keeping Jurassic Park set on its original course. It is introducing a new fictional dinosaur (as if all the dinosaurs of Jurassic Park aren't fictional to begin with--ooh, suck it up buttercup) called "Diabolus rex" (or D-rex), which is an amalgamation of raptor, T. rex, snake, and cuttlefish DNA. It is clearly the next step up in carrying the message of Jurassic Park into a new generation. We all should have seen it coming, a hybridized monster embodying everything Jurassic Park stands for, the foolishness of tampering with nature. I personally am very optimistic, and indeed very excited, about what Jurassic World has to offer the franchise.

"The CGI is bad." While it can be difficult to suspend one's disbelief for a movie with unrealistic special effects, and thus more difficult to engage oneself in the movie, I don't think it's fair to be judging the special effects of Jurassic World for the few short seconds of actual special effects we can see in the teaserception trailer, especially considering the movie is still months away from its theatrical release and most definitely has much more editing and refining to go through before it is remotely a final product. Personally, I think the CGI looks gorgeous considering it's still months away from completion. Teaser trailers are always thrown together long before the movie's theatrical release, and variously contain unrefined scenes, cut scenes, and even scenes developed specifically for the teaser trailer itself that were never intended to be contained within the actual movie whatsoever. We still have a long time to wait until we see newer trailers showcasing more refined special effects, and ultimately the movie itself in all its glory.

The critics need to shut up and wait for the movie to release in theaters. Don't judge a book by its cover, especially an unfinished book.

~Rick Charles

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:iconsinornithosaurus:
Sinornithosaurus Featured By Owner Oct 23, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
Thoughts on the new Spinosaurus discoveries?
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:icondeinonychusempire:
DeinonychusEmpire Featured By Owner Oct 27, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
I was skeptical at first, because quadrupedal locomotion has been suggested for Spinosaurus before, but to me the notion of a quadrupedal theropod is laughable because of course theropods had supinated wrists that would have disallowed them from walking on all fours in the same manner mammals do--which is how it's always depicted. That being said, the newly-discovered limp proportions of Spinosaurus are so radical it forced the authors to propose a unique supinated knuckle-walking stance that I have come to accept. Deep down, Spinosaurus always did look like a quadruped to me, but until the correct limb proportions were discovered it was never a feasible notion to me. I personally welcome the new Spinosaurus and hope it takes off in mainstream paleontology as well as popular culture. Spinosaurus has always been one of my favorite dinosaurs, but now that it is such a more beautifully complete animal, I can now confidently say it is my #1 favorite dinosaur.
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:iconsinornithosaurus:
Sinornithosaurus Featured By Owner Oct 29, 2014  Hobbyist Traditional Artist
I hadn't heard of the limb proportions discovery, interesting!
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:icondeinonychusempire:
DeinonychusEmpire Featured By Owner Nov 2, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
Yes, it's fairly recent news. It's been making headlines.
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(1 Reply)
:icondwarf4r:
Dwarf4r Featured By Owner Oct 8, 2014
Thank you for the faves.Hug :D (Big Grin) 
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